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eNow announces successful 'Rayfrigeration' test

eNow’s “Rayfrigeration” zero-emissions transport refrigeration unit has achieved huge emission reductions during five months of testing on a Class 7 truck delivering fresh dairy products throughout California’s San Joaquin Valley. The battery-powered units posted reductions of 98% in nitrous oxide, 97% in particulate matter, and 86% in carbon dioxide.

Traditional TRUs are powered by high-polluting, small diesel engines to provide the needed cooling to transport chilled products. The Rayfrigeration TRU uses two forms of energy storage: eutectic medium (cold plates) and a high-capacity auxiliary battery system which are initially charged from utility power delivered to the vehicle when plugged in overnight. When the truck is operated on a delivery route, power is provided by eNow’s solar photovoltaic panels mounted on the truck’s roof.

eNow said that average carbon dioxide emissions were reduced from 2,525 lbs/week to 159 while nitrous oxide emissions were reduced from 7162 grams/week to one, after adjusting for the emissions from the power plant supplying grid electricity used overnight. eNow’s 1,800 Watt solar energy system provided more than enough to maintain optimum temperature throughout a typical day of continually opening and closing the doors while delivering fresh dairy products in California’s heat.

“The Rayfrigeration product is an important step forward in reducing emissions while maintaining the highest levels of efficiency and customer satisfaction for companies delivering perishable goods,” said eNow CEO Jeff Flath. “eNow’s solar technology is powerful, reliable and efficient, and more than up to the task of providing emissions-free energy for critical tasks such refrigeration of fresh foods, even the most challenging conditions.”

The Rayfrigeration unit is also projected to reduce operations and maintenance costs by up to 90% over a diesel-powered TRU.

eNow has more than 4,000 solar systems operating nationwide on Class 8 trucks, buses, emergency and utility vehicles, supporting applications as diverse as heating and cooling, liftgates, wheelchair lifts, safety lights, telematics, and other transportation applications.

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